Archive for the ‘Water Heaters’ Category

Does Your Tankless Water Heater Need Repairs?

Monday, September 19th, 2016

Tankless water heaters are an excellent, energy efficient choice for many homeowners throughout the country. They are capable of handling periods when homeowners are away better than traditional storage tank water heaters, and they aren’t susceptible to heat loss and wasted water. A tankless water heater in your home can help you save a good amount of energy, which means you’ll be paying less for utilities each month.

Just like any other type of appliance or system, however, tankless water heaters do run into problems from time to time, and when they do you will need a professional on your side who has the expertise necessary to resolve the issues. Of course, it also helps to know when you may need repairs. Keep reading to learn some of the signs that this may be the case. (more…)

Does Your Tankless Water Heater Need Service?

Monday, July 18th, 2016

Tankless water heaters are an excellent choice for many homes throughout the country. When you are away from your home, these systems make a lot more sense than a traditional storage tank water heater. This is particularly true if we’re talking about a vacation home.

Tankless water heaters warm your water instantly, without you having to worry about running out of hot water. They also save a good deal of energy, which means you save on your monthly bills. Like any other home appliance or device, however, tankless water heaters are not immune to problems. While it takes an expert to repair these issues, we’ve shared some signs below that indicate you should call for professional tankless water heater services. (more…)

Should You Replace Your Traditional Water Heater with a Tankless Model?

Monday, June 13th, 2016

Have you owned the same water heater for a decade or longer? If so, you probably have the popular, standard, tank model. This type of water heater is comprised of a large cylindrical tank, which keeps a constant supply of water stored at a consistent temperature. This hot water is ready for use whenever you turn on a tap in your home. Water heaters of this kind are effective and can sometimes be the best option for your home. However they are certainly not the only option.

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When to Replace Your Tankless Water Heater

Monday, August 24th, 2015

Tankless water heaters are becoming more and more popular among homeowners who are looking to save money and space in their homes. Though they are a great alternative to the traditional storage tank water heater variety, they still aren’t invincible. Regardless of how well you take care of your tankless water heater, you will have to replace it at some point. When that time comes, it’s beneficial to recognize the signs before the water heater fails completely. Let’s examine some of the more common signs that your tankless water heater needs replacing. (more…)

Will a Tankless Water Heater Really Save Money?

Monday, February 16th, 2015

When it comes to water heaters, one of the biggest questions our Sound Heating specialists get asked is, “will a tankless unit really save me money?” The answer is yes, but it takes some explaining, which we will do below. You can also access direct help with any questions you may have about installing a tankless water heater in your home by making an appointment with one of the experts from Sound Heating.

How the Costs Breakdown

The initial costs of a tankless water heater are typically more expensive than that of a storage tank water heater, but this isn’t where the savings comes in anyway. Where the savings comes in is over time, in the form of less energy usage. Storage water heaters not only use a greater amount of energy, they also lose a greater amount of energy, something known as “standby heat loss”; this type of heat loss can account for up to 30% of the energy a storage tank water heater uses. So how do you determine how a tankless water heater can save you money? First, you take into consideration that a tankless water heater will save you about $100 per year in annual energy costs. Second, you look at the lifespans of a tank water heater versus a tankless water heater: tank water heaters have an average lifespan of 8-12 years while tankless ones have a lifespan of 20. When you multiply $100 by 20 years, that’s a total savings of $2,000. Of course, these numbers represent averages, but it stands to reason that you will save money over the lifespan of your tankless water heater’s life.

Other Tankless Benefits

Money savings is just one benefit a tankless water heater can offer you. Some other benefits include:

  • Endless hot water – because tankless systems provide hot water on demand, you won’t ever have to worry about running out of hot water.
  • Gas or electric options – tankless water heaters can use either gas or electricity for power.
  • Space-saving – tankless water heaters are considerably smaller than storage tank ones, which opens up a lot of room for your home.

If you’ve been looking for a way to save on your energy costs, and a tankless water heater sounds like it may be a fit for your home in Auburn, WA, call Sound Heating today!

Are There Some Cases Where a Standard Water Heater Is Better than a Tankless Water Heater?

Friday, September 12th, 2014

You may have heard that tankless water heaters are an efficient alternative to traditional water heaters, but they may not actually be the best choice for everyone. While tankless water heaters are becoming more and more popular, traditional units, otherwise known as storage tank water heaters, are still the most widely used system in the U.S. And even though tankless water heaters save energy and emit fewer pollutants, many homeowners feel as though they benefit more from sticking with a traditional unit instead.

Both types of systems have their advantages. Tankless units are more efficient because they don’t use energy throughout the day. Storage tank water heaters keep water heated in a large tank so it is readily available for use. But this means energy is used throughout the day to heat water that is only used on occasion. A tankless water heater only activates when a hot water tap is turned on, reducing your gas or electricity usage. Also, tankless water heaters are known to last nearly twice as long as a standard water heater, so you’ll have an efficient system for years to come.

But for some homeowners, efficiency isn’t everything. For one, a tankless water heater is often more costly to install than a storage tank heater. And while an efficient tankless unit may eventually save enough energy to offset the price, it can take many years to do so. Besides, you may have to install multiple tankless units to keep up with high demands for hot water in your family.

A common complaint about tankless water heaters is that they may not be effective at heating multiple sources as once. If someone is doing laundry while someone else is showering, some units will struggle to keep up. In this case, you may need to install two or more units depending on the size of your family. And for some homeowners, this cost is not worth the savings over time.

Whether you want to stick with a storage tank water heater or switch to an efficient tankless water heater in Gig Harbor, talk to one of the experts at Sound Heating today!

Tankless vs. Storage Water Heater: Which Is Right for My Home?

Friday, September 5th, 2014

You use hot water for many of the things you need to do every day, such as showering and washing dishes. So when you need a new water heater, you want to make sure that your new system can accommodate your needs. While many homes have water heaters that use large tanks to keep a supply of hot water available, tankless water heaters are rising in popularity recently due to environmental concerns and the money-saving benefits. But is a tankless water heater right for you?

We’ll Compare Both Types of Water Heaters in This Short Guide

Storage Tank Water Heater

A storage tank water heater works under the principle that heat naturally rises. Water enters the tank through a dip tube that feeds all the way to the bottom of the tank. With gas-powered storage tank heaters, there is a gas burner at the bottom of the tank that heats water. In an electric water heater, an electric heating element accomplishes the same. Water then moves naturally from the bottom of your tank to the top as hot water rises over the denser cold water, and flows to your faucet through the pipe that sits at the top of the tank. This type of system may cost more to run as a lot of energy is lost keeping water hot at all times.

Tankless Water Heater

A tankless water heater, on the other hand, does not rely on a tank because water does not need to be heated at all times. Instead, the heating element is activated as soon as a hot water tap is turned on. Water is instantly heated before flowing to your faucet. This eliminates the standby energy loss associated with storage tank heaters. Additionally, many people appreciate the smaller size of the tankless water heater over the bulky storage tank.

So which wins for your home? This all depends on your individual needs. A tankless water heater may use less energy to heat water, but it may not be able to handle demands from multiple taps. You may need to install multiple tankless heaters to make up for this deficiency. However, the energy savings may offset this cost over time. If you want to know which type of unit is best for you, call the experts at Sound Heating and ask about installing tankless water heaters in Gig Harbor.

How Tankless Water Heaters Work

Friday, August 22nd, 2014

We use hot water for a variety of tasks around the house, but we rarely think about where it comes from. If you’re a homeowner, you may be used to seeing storage tank water heaters, which use a large tank to heat water and store it so that it is available at any time. But tankless water heaters have grown in popularity over the years thanks to their ability to heat water quickly and efficiently. So how can a unit heat water instantly without the use of a tank?

A tankless water heater is a “green” alternative to storage tanks that can help you save money over the years and may last longer than conventional units. Curious about how they work? In order to understand tankless water heaters, let’s a take a look at how standard units heat and store hot water.

Storage tank water heaters store water in a large tank to use whenever it is needed. First, cold water enters through a tube that leads to the bottom of the tank. Then a heating mechanism—either a gas-powered burner or an electric-powered heating element—heats the water, which rises to the top of the tank since hot water naturally rises above the denser, colder water. A tube sits at the top of the tank to supply hot water to the home, and cold water continues to cycle in as a replacement.

The problem with storage tank water heaters is the standby energy loss associated with continuously heating standing water. With a tankless heater, water is heated instantly to eliminate this loss. Tankless water heaters simply work through the use of a heat exchange system. Electric coils or gas activate to generate heat as soon as a hot water tap is turned on in the house so that hot water can immediately reach the faucet. Tankless water heaters may not be able to handle multiple jobs at once, so some homes may have several tankless water heaters, each mounted near the tap that activates it.

Want to know if this system is right for your home? Call Sound Heating for more information about tankless water heaters in Gig Harbor!

What Are the Advantages of Installing a Tankless Water Heater?

Friday, June 20th, 2014

The old-fashioned style of water heater that uses a large tank of water to which heat from natural gas or electric heating elements is continually applied is so… old fashioned. There’s a new way to provide hot water for your home that removes the tank and gives you many advantages to take its place: the tankless water heater.

There are many reasons you should consider a tankless water heater in Kent, WA for your next installation. If you need more advice about going this route, talk to Sound Heating today. We install top-brand Rinnai tankless water heaters, which can fit a variety of household sizes and budgets. Call our specialists today to find out more about the tankless water heater edge.

The main advantages of a tankless water heater

  • Never run out of hot water: If someone going with a lukewarm or cold shower in the morning is a common occurrence in your household, then you should consider a tankless system. Because a tankless water heater only heats up water when it’s needed (a reason they are sometimes called “on-demand” water heaters), you never have to worry about running out of your supply of hot water. As soon as a tap turns, the heat exchanger in the system goes to work warming the water.
  • Save energy: A standard storage water heater must apply constant energy to the tank to maintain the necessary 120° –140° water temperature. It uses this energy whether you need the water or not. With a tankless system, you only use energy when you turn on a tap indicating that you need hot water. You’ll end up using only a fraction of the energy necessary for a storage system, and you can expect your heating bills to decrease by 20–35%.
  • Longer system lifespan: Less energy used to heat water also means a system with less wear and tear placed on it. Tankless systems can last many more years than a storage system, and that means you’ll have more years to earn savings on your initial investment.
  • Save space: Because storage systems need to use a large water tank, they take up far more space than a tankless system, which are often small enough to mount on a wall. Some can even go outside with and anti-freeze kit.

There are a few drawbacks to tankless systems: they cost more to install upfront than storage systems, and your level of savings will depend on the amount of water your household uses regularly. Consult with experts to find out if a tankless water heater in Kent, WA is the right choice for your home. Our team at Sound Heating is ready to help you, and we will install your new system so it works for many years.

Water Heater Guide: Sizing a Tankless Water Heater

Wednesday, January 18th, 2012

Tankless water heaters are gaining popularity among Sammamish homeowners because of their on demand hot water supply and space-saving design. Although they are more expensive than traditional tank water heaters, on demand water heaters are more efficient, reliable, and easier to install and maintain. Before choosing to install a tankless water heater, however, you will have to decide which size will meet your hot water needs.

Rather than storing hot water in a tank, the tankless models heat the water with individual units located near the application where hot water is needed, such as a shower or washing machine. For larger homes, some of these smaller units cannot heat enough water for several applications running at the same time. You can also install a single tankless water heater for the entire house, or separate ones for appliances that use more hot water.

Finding the proper size and type will depend on the flow rate—measured  by a GPM (gallons per minute) number—that each fixture needs. Every application has a standard flow rate that must be added up in order to calculate the hot water demands for your entire home. For instance, if someone is using a sink with a 1.5 GPM at the same time another person is running a shower with a 2.0 GPM, the flow rate for the tankless unit would need to be at least 3.5 gallons per minute. You will have to add up the flow rate for all the applications in the house to get the minimum GPM figure for your tankless water heater.

In addition to flow rates, tankless hot water heaters are also measured by how much the water temperature needs to rise as it moves through the heating unit. You can determine the temperature rise for each application by subtracting the temperature of water coming in from the desired temperature going out. Once you add those together with the overall flow rates, you will know which tankless water heater can handle your overall hot water needs.

Before you buy an on demand hot water heater, it is best to talk to a professional installer. While the flow rates and temperature rise for most household appliances are fairly standard, these numbers can vary because of several factors that professionals are trained to calculate. Size is not the only factor to consider when shopping for a tankless water heater. Fuel type and efficiency should also be factored in to your purchase, which is another reason to talk to a licensed Sammamish installer.